Yikes! I’ve Created Another Sexy Villain

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Ask any fiction author. They’ll tell you characters have minds of their own. And believe me, I have experienced this phenomenon many times myself. There’ve been times when a character came out differently than planned, and always been for the better.


Other villains, however, had a certain quality about them. They’re more complex, more charismatic and, for lack of a better word, sexy. Jeremy Palmer in The Reunion was the first. Originally intended to be a rogue character who would do his dirty deed and disappear, Jeremy had that special charisma. He became a rival, competing with his father to win Gillian’s affections. Josh Ramsey in The Letter was a conman. Then the chemistry between him and Stephanie unexpectedly sizzled. So I revamped him into a mystery man.


I strive to make my villains as despicable as I can. There’s nothing more fun than a villain we love to hate getting their comeuppance. Some of my more dastardly villains include Scott Andrews in The Betrayal. Scott was a married guy presenting himself as a single guy to entice unsuspecting single women. Then there’s Beau Fowler, the corrupt detective in The Betrayal. He tried to frame an innocent woman for a crime she didn’t commit. And finally, there’s Craig Walker, the sociopathic villain in The Stalker. He’ll resort to kidnapping and murder to get what he wants. 


Now it’s happening again. This time it’s Calvin Michaelson, in my upcoming novel, The Scandal. Cal’s a Hollywood mogul with a reputation as a playboy. Intended to be a despicable villain for readers to hate, his character became more dynamic than expected. He too is being revamped. He’ll still be a playboy, but at the end of the story a new and completely unexpected side to Cal will be revealed. 


The Scandal will be available later this summer.

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Meet Martha Morrison, the Antagonist in THE LETTER

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Unlike most of my antagonists, Martha isn’t an evil person. She’s extremely annoying. The kind of person who gets under your skin like a bad rash.


Martha briefly dated leading man Danny. He told her upfront there would be no strings attached. Lonely and vulnerable, Martha ignored Danny’s conditions and latched onto him, believing that he was the man she was destined to spend her life with. Danny soon met Stephanie and ended his relationship with Martha. But even without Stephanie, Danny had already decided to move on. 


Martha’s reaction to their breakup wasn’t what Danny expected. Believing that Danny simply needs a timeout, she fully supports him dating other women. In her mind, dating other women will prove to him, once and for all, that she’s the only woman for him, and she’s willing to wait for as long as it takes. In the meantime, she’ll stay in touch.

She begins with emails and text messages, but when a family member openly disapproves, she switches tactics. Handwritten love letters would eliminate an electronic paper trail. She also thinks handwritten letters are more romantic. Danny never responds to any of her messages. However, he’s keeping all of her letters in a file to build a case against her. This will, unfortunately, have serious unintended consequences for him.


Unlike like Craig Walker, Martha hasn’t set out to intentionally cause any harm. A desperately lonely woman, she’s afraid of being on her own, and unable to accept the fact that Danny isn’t love with her.


We have a saying in the writing business that goes, You can’t make this stuff up. Martha is loosely based on a woman who dated a friend’s husband before he married my friend. The old girlfriend kept writing him love letters thinking he’d come back to her someday. Of course, he never did. 


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Meet Craig Walker

the Evil Villain from THE STALKER

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Few things are more fun about this job than creating truly evil, nasty, vile antagonists. And when it comes to mean, nasty and downright evil, Craig Walker from The Stalker is an absolute delight.


A writer by profession, Craig met leading lady Rachel while working as a staff writer for a regional lifestyle magazine. Rachel considered Craig a mentor, but he had much bigger plans for her, and they went well above and beyond being her mentor. Those plans, however, were suddenly foiled when she accepted a promotion he felt she didn’t deserve. Unaware that she had applied for the position, he reacted with rage, and after an ugly confrontation she ended the friendship. Craig, however, had no intention of letting Rachel go. He began stalking her, long after the magazine went out of business. Craig wants Rachel, and he intends to have her at all costs, whether she wants him or not. Now he’s come up with plan for getting his way with her, once and for all.


The inspiration Craig came from a man who stalked someone I knew, and he made her life miserable for years.


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Meet Annette

The Mistress You’ll Love to Hate in THE BETRAYAL

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There are two kinds of women who get involved with married men. Some are like Carrie, the leading lady in my earlier novel, The Deception. They’re duped into believing the man is single and available. Then there is the other kind. She knows upfront the man is married, but chooses to get involved with him anyway.


Annette, one of the antagonists in The Betrayal, is the latter. Not only does she know, from the get-go, that Jesse is a married man, she also knows his wife, Emily. Jesse, however, is nothing if not charming and seductive. He takes full advantage of the fact that Annette has become disillusioned with her significant other, and he uses it as the catalyst to initiate their affair.

Annette thinks she’s doing Emily a favor by breaking them up. She knows Emily put her dream of becoming a concert pianist on hold to help Jesse with his career. Therefore, she is, “helping” Emily by freeing her so she can finally pursue her dream. Emily, however, doesn’t quite see it that way.


Jesse soon tires of Annette. He ends the affair and tries to win Emily back. Annette, however, has no intention of going quietly into the night. She comes up with her own desperate scheme to get Jesse back. The consequences of which will forever change the lives of everyone involved.


Annette is a purely fictitious character, and, thankfully, not inspired by anyone I’ve ever encountered. There are, unfortunately, plenty of real life Annettes out there. That’s what makes her the woman you’ll love to hate.


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Meet Jesse St. Claire the Unfaithful Husband in The Betrayal

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What would a romance novel of betrayal and adultery be without a cheating spouse? Jesse St. Claire, the unfaithful husband in The Betrayal, is perhaps my most complicated and enigmatic antagonist to date. Unlike Scott Andrews, the cheating husband in my earlier novel, The Deception, Jesse really isn’t a player. In fact, he’s never cheated before. A highly successful motivational speaker, Jesse steadfastly claims to love his wife, and, in his own strange way, he does. Or, at least he thinks he does.


Jesse has built his career on helping people take control of their lives, but his own life begins spiraling out of control when his wife, Emily, catches him in the act with Annette, his personal assistant. As Emily packs her bags and walks out the door, a determined Jesse tries to come up with a plan to win her back. Not only does he want to save his marriage, he also wants to save his career. Unfortunately for Jesse, bad habits prove difficult to break. His past soon comes back to haunt him, forcing him to once again betray his wife.


Jesse is a fictitious character not based on anyone I know. His inspiration comes from many stories of unfaithful men who claim to love their wives, which, for those of us who don’t cheat, is something we can never fully understand.


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Meet Beau Fowler

The Corrupt Cop in THE BETRAYAL

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Sometimes the people we think we can trust the most are the very people who’ll betray us. The Betrayal is a good cop vs bad cop story. Kyle Madden, the leading man, is a good cop. He risks his career and his life to save Emily, the leading lady. However his partner, Beau Fowler, is also his nemesis. 


A thirty-year police veteran, Beau has caught his fair share of bad guys. During that time, however, he’s also been passed up for promotions, oftentimes by younger officers he helped train. Now his luck appears to be changing. He’s been called to investigate a suspicious death at the home of a well-known motivational speaker. It’s the high profile case he’s been waiting for. All he has to do is get a conviction and he’s sure to get his long overdue promotion; even if it means framing an innocent woman. In Beau’s mind, people sometimes have the misfortune of being in the wrong place at the wrong time.  


Beau Fowler is a purely fictitious character. Sadly, his inspiration is the occasional bad cop out there who inflicts harm innocent citizens. Fortunately, such officers are rare. Most police officers are like Kyle; good people who put their lives on the line each and everyday. 


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Meet Denise Sanderson the Evil Nurse in The Journey

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If I had to list the most evil of the villains I’ve created so far in any of my romance novels, Denise Sanderson would most  certainly near at the top. She’s the last person readers would expect to be so evil.


Denise is a young nurse. At first she appears to be genuinely compassionate and caring. However, Denise has a darker side. When she was in nursing school, she frequented a bar called O’Malley’s Grill, and soon fell in love with one of the bartenders. Jeremy Palmer. Unfortunately for Denise, Jeremy, didn’t feel the same. When she tried to come onto him, he turned her down. Jeremy soon moved on, but Denise neither forgave, nor forgot, his rejection.


Jeremy and Denise would meet again, this time under different circumstances. Denise, now a nurse, has been assigned to care for Jeremy’s wife. Cassie has been seriously injured in a car crash. Denise quickly befriends both Cassie and Jeremy, and while Jeremy can’t quite place her, she seems familiar nonetheless. He feels he can trust her, but Denise will use his trust to unleash her revenge, and Jeremy’s life will never be the same.


Denise is a fictitious character, but she also represents a deep-seeded fear many of us may have. What if the people we trust to take care of us during our most vulnerable times really don’t have our best interests in mind?


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Meet Scott Andrews the Deceiver in The Deception

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They’re out there. The liars. The cheaters. The scumbags. The players. The married men who put themselves out as single men. And, like the predators they are, they like to prey on unsuspecting single women, looking for lasting relationships.


Scott Andrews, the antagonist in my romance novel, The Deception, is one of those predators. Handsome and charming, Scott can, and does, pass himself off as a single man. He presents himself as the perfect catch for a single woman looking for her soulmate. And, unfortunately, for the woman, she has no idea that Scott’s married.


A mutual friend introduces Scott to leading lady Carrie, the leading lady. As usual, he presents himself as a single man, and he hasn’t just fooled Carrie. He’s also fooled their mutual friend, Allison. Not only does Allison believe that Scott is single, she also thinks he might be a good match for Carrie, who’s Carrie still recovering from an earlier breakup. Scott quickly takes advantage of her vulnerability, but she’ll soon realize things aren’t adding up. By then it will too late, and the consequences will leave her life shattered.


Scott is inspired by someone I once knew, and by stories other women have told me. He may be a fictional character, but there are, unfortunately, many real life Scotts out there. Stay safe, ladies.

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Killing Characters Off

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From time to time nearly every novel writer has to kill off a character. However, I’ll only do it is when it’s absolutely necessary to enhance the plot.


This first time I killed someone off was when I wrote The Reunion. Gillian’s ex husband, Jason Matthews, was one of the villains in the story. He meets an untimely end, but it happens “off camera.” Gillian hears of his demise from a police detective. They say show, don’t tell, but sometimes telling can be more compelling.


I killed off another villain in The Deception. It happens near the end of the story. Most of the plot had revolved around this character’s conflict with leading lady Carrie. She’s finally won battle. However, this particular antagonist soon figured out a way to get even. I could have saved it for a possible sequel, but in this case the second conflict was directly related to the first. It would have made a sequel redundant. Therefore, rather than have the storyline repeat itself, I killed the character off. Thus ending the conflict once and for all.


In my soon-to-be released novel, The Journey, I killed a supporting character from The Reunion. This character was one I honestly liked. I tried to come up with a way for her to survive, but when I did the story simply wasn’t as strong. Her death was an intrical part of the plot. It happens early in the novel, but she still maintains a presence in the rest of the story.

The Journey will be soon available.


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Meet Maggie Andrews

The Queen of Mean in “The Deception”

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Sometimes the villains I create are downright disturbing. Maggie Andrews certainly fits the description. She’s the woman readers love to hate in The Deception.


Maggie is the last person you’d expect to be so mean. She’s a stay-at-home mom who’s married to Scott, a software engineer. They have two typical all-American kids and live in a nice home in the suburbs. She and Scott also share a passion for art collecting. Maggie believes she’s living the good life. Unfortunately for her, Scott has been leading a double life, and her perfect world is about to be shattered.


Every morning Maggie likes to grab a second cup of coffee and catch up on her email. Then one fateful she borrows Scott’s laptop, and her life will take an unexpected turn. She’ll accidentally discover that Scott has a second email account. Her curiosity gets the better of her and she hacks her way in, only to discover something she never wanted to know. Her heart breaks, but whatever sympathy readers may feel for her will be short lived. A darker side of Maggie quickly emerges as she hatches a plan for revenge that will have potentially deadly consequences.


Maggie is a fictitious character not inspired by anyone I’ve encountered in real-life. (Thank goodness.) She’s a spiteful woman who’s incapable of forgiveness, even after those who have wronged her have admitted it and apologized for their transgressions. She’s also the personification of the concept that two wrongs never make a right. That’s why readers love to hate her.

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